Sunday, May 7, 2017

The Historian Channel, The Celts - History Documentary "Heroes in Defeat" Film


In the third episode of the series, the program examines the heyday of the Celts, the La Tene era. It was tribal, and women were often the leaders: warriors, bards, druids, artists and craftsmen. Their little known settlements as well as their massive hill forts tell of inhabitants who traded within and beyond Europe. But then the Celts clashed with the Romans and highly developed culture fell apart.

The Celts were the first European people north of the Alps to rise from anonymity. This program looks at who the Celts were, where they came from and what made their culture so distinctive.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Historian Channel: Galen of Pergamum, History of Medicine




This short films exposes the ancients as the fathers of modern medicine, treatments and procedures were lost in the dark ages and only reinvented by modern man.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The Dark Heretic. Isaac Newton BBC 2003 Documentary



This BBC documentary outlines the evidence that suggests that Newton's revolutionary ideas about light came from his secret work as an alchemist.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Friday, February 17, 2017

History Documentary: Silk Road, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan



History Documentary: Silk Road, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan

Kyrgyzstan's recorded history spans over 2,000 years, encompassing a variety of cultures and empires. Although geographically isolated by its highly mountainous terrain – which has helped preserve its ancient culture – Kyrgyzstan has historically been at the crossroads of several great civilizations, namely as part of the Silk Road and other commercial and cultural routes. Though long inhabited by a succession of independent tribes and clans, Kyrgyzstan has periodically come under foreign domination and attained sovereignty as a nation-state only after the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Once part of the Turkic Khaganate and later Timurid Empires, the region that today includes the Republic of Uzbekistan was conquered in the early 16th century by Eastern Turkic-speaking nomads. The area was gradually incorporated into the Russian Empire during the 19th century, and in 1924 what is now Uzbekistan became a bordered constituent republic of the Soviet Union, known as the Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic (Uzbek SSR). Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, it declared independence as the Republic of Uzbekistan.
Credits: Wikipedia

Sunday, February 12, 2017

History Documentary: Japan, the Secret Empire



Commanding shoguns and fierce samurai warriors, exotic geisha and exquisite artisans - all were part of a Japanese renaissance between the 16th and 19th centuries when Japan went from chaos and violence to a land of ritual refinement and peace.

But stability came at a price: for nearly 250 years, Japan was a land closed to the Western world, ruled by the shogun under his absolute power and control. Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire brings to life the unknown story of a mysterious empire, its relationship with the West, and the forging of a nation that would emerge as one of the most important countries in the world.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Historian Channel: Documentay history of the Lost Kingdoms of West Africa, BBC Documentary


Art historian Gus Casely-Hayford explores the history of the Lost Kingdoms of West Africa, with particular attention to the 16th-century bronzes from the kingdom of Benin.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

History Documentary: The Saxons, History of the Anglo-Saxons (Angles and Saxon tribes)



The Saxons (Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen, German: Sachsen, Dutch: Saksen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea coast of what is now Germany (Old Saxony), in late Roman times. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks. Significant numbers settled in large parts of Great Britain in the early Middle Ages and formed part of the merged group of Anglo-Saxons who eventually organised the first united Kingdom of England. Many Saxons however remained in Germania, where they resisted the expanding Frankish Empire through the leadership of the semi-legendary Saxon hero, Widukind.

The Saxons' earliest area of settlement is believed to have been Northern Albingia, an area approximately that of modern Holstein. This general area also included the probable homeland of the Angles. Saxons, along with the Angles and other continental Germanic tribes, participated in the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain during and after the 5th century. The British-Celtic inhabitants of the isles tended to refer to all these groups collectively as Saxons. It is unknown how many Saxons migrated from the continent to Britain, though estimates for the total number of Anglo-Saxon settlers are around 200,000. During the Middle Ages, because of international Hanseatic trading routes and contingent migration, Saxons mixed with and had strong influences upon the languages and cultures of the Baltic peoples, Finnic peoples, and Polabian Slavs and Pomeranians, both West Slavic peoples, as well as influencing the North Germanic languages.
Credits: Wikipedia

Sunday, January 1, 2017